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Explained! The Link between Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

20
Apr

Explained! The Link between Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Coronary Heart Disease (CHD)

Your blood puts forward numerous indicative signs concerning your heart’s health. For instance, if you have high levels of “bad” cholesterol in your bloodstream, it signifies that you’re subject to high risks of inviting a heart attack.

Besides, other components of blood facilitate your doctor to ascertain the proneness of any imminent heart failure or potentials to develop arterial plaque deposits, a condition known as Atherosclerosis.

What is CBC?

A complete blood count (CBC) is a commonly performed blood test which doctors make use of in a bid to assess overall health and distinguish a broad array of maladies including anemia, infection, heart ailments and blood cancer.

A complete blood test in Paschim Viharis accountable to measurequite a lot ofcomponents present in and features of your blood. These include:

  • Red blood cells - responsible for carrying oxygen into the bloodstream
  • White blood cells - that help combat infection and guard against illnesses
  • Hemoglobin - the protein which is the carrier of oxygen in red blood cells
  • Hematocrit - the proportion of red blood cells to plasma, the blood’s characteristic fluid constituent
  • Platelets –responsible for blood clotting

When a CBC report reveals an atypical increase or decrease in cell counts it may indicate that you’re suffering from a repressed medical condition that requires further assessment.

How CBC components act as probable risk predictors for coronary heart disease?

  • Atherosclerosis is essentially an inflammatory disorder. There are a number of biomarkers, for example, C-reactive protein, that has been used to assess the possibilities of inflammatory disorders and risks of coronary heart disease.
  •   If you find very high white blood cell count, the observation relates to strongly and independently predicting coronary risks in both male and female patients.
  • A high count of white blood cells together with their subtypes (eosinophil, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes) is directly linked to the inception or existence of coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke.
  • This high value of white blood cells is akin to manifestation of C-reactive protein or other markers associated with inflammatory disorders.
  • Furthermore, other components of CBC, like hematocrit and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) exhibit straight connections with coronary heart diseases.
  • When you combine the CBC with the white blood cell count, it can improve the chances to foretell possible risks of coronary heart diseases.
  • These tests at a reputed pathology laboratory in Paschim Vihar are inexpensive, available far and wide, easy to ask for and interpret – all of these under the able guidance and supervision of a thoroughly acclaimed cardiologist Dr.Lalchandani and his team of professional medical associates.

Blood test to look for troponin T

  • A newly originated and more sensitive blood test that amplifies the odds of a heart attack diagnosis may proffer a broader application as a potent screening tool for premature heart damage.
  • This one-off blood test searches for a protein named troponin T discharged from the injured muscle cells of the heart.
  • A special health checkup in Paschim Vihar is typically ordered when patients experiencing excruciating chest pain visit the emergency room.
  • The blood test helps doctors distinguish potential causes of heart attacks prompted either by heartburn or other mimic complaints.
  • Factually, troponin T may be existent inside your body in much lower levels but suddenly gets worse just before the onset of a grave cardiac arrest. It reflects a quiet sign of your heart reeling under stress.

Research also signifies that patients having appreciably detectable troponin T levels are more vulnerable to heart failures or even mortality.

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